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Language: why we like some words more than others

When we listen to a foreign language, we may hear sounds which do not exist in our mother tongue, and may sound different from anything we have ever heard before. The first time we hear something new, a foreign sound or word – even an unknown word in our own languages – something in it may provoke delight or revulsion.

Often with familiar words, it’s almost impossible to simply look at one and separate it from its meaning. Words like “putrid” or “disgusting” have nasty connotations already built in to our subconscious and therefore meaning will play a key role.

Two in five people think they would be a good teacher but low pay and workload deters them, unions say

Nearly half of us believe we would make a good teacher, a survey has found – but many of those interested in taking up the profession are just not entering classrooms.

A “crushing” workload, low pay and “attacks on professionalism” are behind the low uptake, unions have said.

Teachers on Twitter: why you should join and how to get started

I’ve been using Twitter for six months and it’s already one of the best career decisions I’ve made.

For a while, it seemed that my relationship with teaching was going to be short lived (the first rush of excitement and energy was gone and in need of resuscitation). But thanks to some of the inspiring educators on Twitter, I have fallen back in love with teaching.

Brexit could create a new ‘language’ – Euro-English

Brexit could lead to the development of a new form of the English language, according to a new academic paper.

Dr Marko Modiano, of Gavle University in Sweden, said there were already signs that “Euro-English” was developing its own distinct way of speaking.

And this could eventually be codified in a dictionary and taught in schools in much the same way that American or Australian English is today if English is retained as the lingua franca of the European Union after the UK leaves.