5 ways to keep students’ attention in class

In one of our posts earlier in the year we suggested a few ways of getting students’ attention when the class is not listening. Ideas such as call and response, transitional chants or songs, and countdowns can work well when you need to get the attention of the whole class, although if used too often can lose their effectiveness.

Read: 8 Young learner first lesson problems and solutions. 

So what can we do to get, and more importantly, keep our students’ attention? Here are five top tips! 

Addressing Disruptive Behavior in EFL Classrooms

FBA is the process of gathering and analyzing information about a student’s problem behavior in order to determine the purpose of the actions, which is an investigation designed to help educators. FBA has been recommended as an effective method to be used at the first signs of mild to moderate misbehavior and a great professional development opportunity which can change the way teachers look at problematic behaviors.

Reduce children's test anxiety with these tips—and a re-think of what testing means

The term "test anxiety" typically conjures up images of a high school or university student obsessing over an upcoming exam.

 

Certainly, older students have been the focus of more than a half a century of research examining test and assessment anxiety and its impact on grades. Researchers know that such test anxiety generally has a negative impact on academic achievement.

How I discovered there are (at least) 14 different kinds of love by analysing the world’s languages

No emotion, surely, is as cherished and sought after as love. Yet on occasions such as Valentine’s day, we can often be misled into thinking that it consists solely in the swooning, star-crossed romance of falling deeply “in love”. But on reflection, love is far more complex. Indeed, arguably no word covers a wider range of feelings and experiences than love.

How people talk now holds clues about human migration centuries ago

Often, you can tell where someone grew up by the way they speak.

For example, if someone in the United States doesn’t pronounce the final “r” at the end of “car,” you might think they are from the Boston area, based on sometimes exaggerated stereotypes about American accents and dialects, such as “Pahk the cahr in Hahvahd Yahd.”

Hearing hate speech primes your brain for hateful actions

A mark on a page, an online meme, a fleeting sound. How can these seemingly insignificant stimuli lead to acts as momentous as participation in a racist rally or the massacre of innocent worshippers? Psychologists, neuroscientists, linguists and philosophers are developing a new theory of language understanding that’s starting to provide answers.

Language: why we like some words more than others

When we listen to a foreign language, we may hear sounds which do not exist in our mother tongue, and may sound different from anything we have ever heard before. The first time we hear something new, a foreign sound or word – even an unknown word in our own languages – something in it may provoke delight or revulsion.

Often with familiar words, it’s almost impossible to simply look at one and separate it from its meaning. Words like “putrid” or “disgusting” have nasty connotations already built in to our subconscious and therefore meaning will play a key role.